Skip to main content

About your Search

English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
that obama doesn't want a recession. i beg to differ. he does want that. it is not just me saying this. wow ho ward dean said we are going to get deep cuts and when the republicans get blamed they will come back and extend the bush era rate and it is going along well as far as they are concerned. i feel that mr. obama could be bluffed. i feel like he doesn't want a recession. i will take that. remember, these guys don't think that the economy is going to suffer that much. they think they will take credit. that is how they think. talk about social engineering. what happened to the jack kemp argument. what about empowerment. john f kennedy had the same thing. i don't want to bring some down and some up. i want to bring everybody up. where is that argument? >> and jack kennedy said, if you want to raise tax revenues, you must cut tax rates. the opposite of what obama said. they don't believe it. they want a western european style cradle to grave state. they want to make sure that they preserve it and they want to pay for it. the middle class is going to be nailed and they are going to blame re
point can they really -- not just offset but move the needle. i know they're not beg enough to impact your growth business but they're growing fast and they seem like a secular growth story. >> they'll still small in the overall $2.2 billion in revenue that we have. however, i growthing quickly. the nonpayroll business is over $500 million now. it's a growing business. and just selling health insurance has grown a little over 20% just the last year. we're pretty happy with that business and we think it will continue to do well. >> the last thing i'm going to ask you, what is your message to washington right now about what needs to be done? >> well, i think it's got to get done. whaef it is, you know, i think what businesses are waiting for is to see with certainty what they're going to face next year. and i think the sooner it get done, the sooner that entrepreneurs and small business owners are going to either start or expand their businesses and we just need some certainty, something out there that they know they're going to face with health care reform and with all the tax situatio
in there. >> so to my friend carter, i beg to differ. please, please let me differ. first of all, i'd like to say i'm not wildly excited about any of these names. the spending budget for these companies in the tens of billions of dollars to keep in constant need for higher band width. and verizon is a bond proxy. yielding close to 5%, it's closer to a junk bond proxy with a high grade quality to it. so i kind of like that if you're into safe investing. problem with sprint is they are the proverbial. they have not run commensurately as a business. i'm sure someone could take them out, but i'm not sure you want to buy the name just on that. >> so is there anything that would make you want to own these then, zach? >> no. i suppose if i was into -- 27 years old and needed a 4.7% yield on something i thought had a good chance of not going down a lot were verizon would be attractive for those reasons. >> well, that is certainly a reason to own them. >> right. it is as he points out 5%. at this point at this multiple at this appreciation as you sarted the segment, one of the best performers in th
numbers are actually down, it does start to beg the whole question of, you know, okay, at what point in time do we step away from the long trade on this stock, being up 125% and actually think about going the other way? >> all right. we'll be watching that. i mean, this stock, three seconds ago it was at six and now it's at 14. you think it's going back to 6? >> i would simply say if there'sing in ivoktive of a cliff it's a stock with a name rimm. >> david garrity, always great to talk with you from gba research ks so much, david. back with more from indiana governor mitch dan else and conagra food stocks hitting its highest levels of the year. can 2013 be better? talk with that company's ceo on the other side of the break in an interview you see only here. how he plans to grow conagra's consumer food business and why brand names may no longer be worth the money. later stay with me for more on the nyc/i.c.e. deal. don't miss it. back in a moment. impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we unde
discussing the war on coal. that's a lot. why the false identity is the question that continues to be begged and hopefully we can answer. >> there wasn't a regulation that she didn't like and she didn't want to impose. >> can the coal companies breathe easier now? can we see new power generation happening in this country or are we going get someone just like her because they'll want to work for president obama? >> right. here's the thing. she was hailed by rolling stone as the most progressive ep achieve ever, but at the end of the day she was effectuating a radical agenda set by the president. this war on coal was set forth when he gave his shellacking press conference and said there were other ways to skin that cat. so you're going to get somebody who wants the job to effectuate his agenda and it won't be anybody much better, i suppose, but the good news may lie on what we find. there are 12,000 e-mails that by their very nature assuming the false identity that she didn't want the public to see and these on coal.00 e-mails addressing maybe there was news in there that was candid and becaus
his lunch ready, and i kept saying, "please just stay home." i just begged him, and he wouldn't. mary middleton and priscilla petra's husbands both died from carbon monoxide poisoning after the explosion. they were found wearing emergency breathing equipment, but state investigators concluded they had used less than 25% of their emergency oxygen supply. it is unclear from the report why both men had plenty of oxygen and yet suffocated. priscilla petra believes the equipment must have been broken. >> i just know that if that had worked, he would have walked out of there. they weren't that far underground. they were under there, i'm not sure exactly how far, but they could have walked out of there had they had that-- the oxygen. >> i feel like these men are a dime a dozen in the coal operators' eyes. it's all-- it's all in the product. "we want the money. get the coal out, get the coal out, get the coal out. >> why do you think the families of the miners who died are blaming the mine operators to such an extent? why do you think they're so convinced that the mine operators were at fault
is really kind of begging to be sold. technically speaking it's in this long-term consolidation i'm sure dennis is watching, fx traders like me are dying to sell this long-term consolidation up around the 1.05 level. i'd love to get short aussie in nfp. >> give me your level and we'll debt dennis' reaction. >> short at 1.0525 and put a stop off on 1.0625 and about 1.03 we can ring the register. >> denis? >> i've got the other side of trade, i'm long of the dollar against the japanese yen, it's been working and i'll continue to do it. if it takes out 1.0525. >> you must be bullish on stocks. >> i'm very bullish on the stock market absolutely. >> todd good to see you. for more trades watch "money in motion" tomorrow 5:30 p.m. eastern time. next up on "halftime" sell the winners and buy the losers, "hold 'em or fold 'em" is next when we come back. >>> who doesn't know this? sometimes it is tough to buy the losers and sell the winners. let's play a little "hold 'em fold 'em." first up, bank of america continues to climb, up almost 80% this year. last check it was holding above 10. >> to me i
begged them to just get us down to january 15th without some sort of horrible tax rate increase. we would have kicked all those other issues down the road. this is more comprehensive and i think it's a better solution than we could have hoped for. >> there's still a can that is being kicked down the road as we speak and that road may be very tough for a lot of companies out there and may make it difficult for first quarter earnings. >> consumers, as everybody's taxes are going up. you look at consumer credit. it is at all-time highs and a two standard deviation from the 50-year trend. consumer credit is a fixed cost. your income goes down. you have a problem paying that credit. so, that's why after the first couple months you could have some issues with consumers in this market. >> again, consumer discretionary, the payroll tax is going on you right -- excuse me, the holiday is going away -- >> increase. >> people feel this right away. confidence is not good right now. it gets worse. >> first paycheck of the year, you will see your taxes go up 2%. >> how you feel about that? >> not good.
it's a beg thy neighbor. everybody is printing -- >> at the core of what the fed is trying to do is phillips curvean in that they're trying to trade short-term gains in unemployment for modest upticks in inflation. if they get their way, presumably the gold bowls will come back out of the woodwork. >> if it goes from 200 to 1, 800, it's anticipated. >> how much did that suit cost? >> not very much. tie's a different story. >> not $1,800? >> no, not $1,800. >> you should be able to buy a suit for an ounce of gold. that's always been the -- >> i was not aware of the suit-to-gold ratio. >> suit-to-gold ratio. you -- never, never been your -- >> suits -- >> you've always need good five or six troy ounces to buy -- >> you buy a brioni suit, can you pay in gold bars? >> that's how i usually do. it. >>> real quick, boxing day according to wikipedia, traditionally the day following christmas when servants and tradesmen would receive gifts from their supervisors. this was an old english tradition apparently when servants would wait on their masters on christmas day, the servants of the we
. so, i'm begging members of congress, and the executive, to please get something done here that reassures consumers, reassures business operations, most important of all, to create the jobs in america, and these are permanent jobs that we want to have created. please provide them with the incentive to use the monetary wherewithal, whether it's the right amount or an excessive amount which i would argue, but that's not the issue. the issue is, they need to be incentives to use widely available liquidity, the lowest interest rates in american history, put it to work, to create more american jobs, and increase american prosperity. >> if we're really arguing -- >> unless they do that they will have failed the american people. >> the fiscal cliff brings a lot of austerity very quickly. but we all think that, you know, sooner or later we need some type of austerity, whether it's on a scale, you know, like the fiscal cliff is a 10, we don't want a deal that is a 1, that just, you know, that doesn't cut spending, that doesn't raise revenue. so i just worry that, you know, we seem l
for everybody under, and you pick the number. >> i would just beg, you know, it's like you want to beg these guys in d.c. to do something. to help this country just get to where it was. get people to work. they can do it. they really can. >> i went to a doctor this morning, and apple didn't come up and i was thinking, hey, could be closer to -- >> it did not come up. this is the first thought that didn't come up, tempted to go to the dentist just to get a dentist check. get an opinion on how many people are worried about apple. >> grover has said point blank that you're finished if you vote for a tax increase. and grover so far has been much more powerful than boehner. like the shadow governor of the republican party. everyone knows that conference call that grover runs keeps everybody in line. >> when do you think we're going to get to 6.5? >> i think it will take three years. >> really? i think it will take awhile. i see unemployment coming down to the low 70s, sometime next year. or sometime after next year, 2015 or so. >> good monday morning, we're live here at post nine at the new
lauz but born with an . >> you know, i beg to differ, mr. president. to me, i understand the use of its is a weapon but to me the real problem isn't the debt ceiling. it's the debt. the debt is the problem. you know, to have an unlimited amount of money to call upon is too much power power for one person. it's always in our country been about checks and balances but i think this administration just wants more checks and no balancing of the checkbook. that isn't the kind of check and balance that i think the people that wrote the constitution had in mind. now, let's look at it a different way, when we think of, you know, some good entertainment, there's, you know, bob hope, the road to morocco, the road to singapore. i don't think that we want to have a movie someday called the road to the weimar republic because bob hope was in the old movies. there's no hope in that new movie and i think this issue really has to be discussed. now i understand there's issues about compromise and everybody has heard that the president and the democrats won the white house. i understand that but the debt
up under most of the proposals. >> but this all begs the question of a great example this whole fiscal cliff the conversation we're having right here around the table about the simplification of our tax system. we laid out back during the campaign was basically a 20% flat tax across the board and gets away from all of these exemptions and all of the quite frankly you having to have two cpas and a lawyer to be able to do your taxes. and that's where washington really needs to be focused when we talk about what do they really need to be doing up there talking about spending obviously and talking about how you simplify the tax code in this country. allowing that -- the foreign dollars that are raised offshore to come back in here at a relatively low tax rate. to be able to drive the economy of this country. that's what they need to be talking about instead of the -- >> the only people that want a complicated tax code are the lobbyists. people may argue over the end rate but --? the current administration wants a complicated tax code, too, because the more you keep it complicated, t
linda was begging homebuilders to hire sfrunlts the job corps program. >> there was nothing going on. >> now they're in high demand and they know it. >> there's a resurgence in construction, so i know this is the place to be. >> housing starts climb to an annualized rate after falling to a low of just around half a million in 2009 when the industry and the trade were decimated. >> over 2 million workers left the construction industry, and most of those are not coming back, so we have a great need to have skilled workers. >> with instructors from the nonprofit home building institute these students learn plumbing, weatherization, painting, all the construction skills you would see on a residential or commercial site. so the big question is why did all those workers who left not come back? well, remember, this housing recession has been going on for almost five years now and a lot of them have retrained into other careers. another point to make that is very important, if we go over the fiscal cliff, not only will the housing recovery come to a grinding halt, but programs like this one,
in the first paycheck -- i beg your pardon, tax increases in the first paycheck presumably for people earning $250,000 or more. and that's just the start, isn't it, andy? >> i think actually a good deal for the market is a grand bargain of sorts. i don't think it will be $4 trillion. but $2.5 trillion would be the best outcome for markets. that is less fiscal tightening, which would help the markets in the near term. but i also think that if you think about entitlement savings down the road and having people stay in the work force longer, because it won't be as jen rours a benefits package, i think that's pro-gdp. people will be working longer. that's not sucking something out of the economy. >> chuck, forgive me, but i'm quite concerned that maybe the market has lost sight of what the underlying state of the economy may be here. goldman sachs, as a result of its financial services conference, they say clarity around the fiscal cliff may help with the margin. but there's no pentup demand that would aid growth next year. chuck, is goldman sachs right? are those attendees of that banking confer
, folks at "the new york times," be a little more hypocritical of mr. buffett, please. i beg you. i'm done with my nasty stuff today. >> warren buffett is almost sacred. >> not to me, simon. >> there are no sacred cows. you know that. >> not to me. he's an investor like anybody else. >> keep those tweets coming. ben bernanke celebrating his 59th birthday today. we want to know, what do you think bernanke will be wishing for when he blows out his birthday candles which, of course, is what you do if you're on the board of the fomc? tweet us, @squawkstreet. we'll read some of your answers next. sors. can i help you? i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make t
on the street." here's what's happening so far. >> i'm begging members of congress and the executive to please get something done here that reassures consumers, reassures business operators, most important of all to create the jobs in america. >> there are going to be some revenues involved but there need to be multiples of that in entitlement cuts. so i've taken enough flack on both the right and the left of this equation to know that i'm in the right place. >> every company on retail is saying, look at us. behind the scenes, guys, tell me. how is it going? they all say, what, are you kidding me? we got two weeks here. we don't know. i mean, they got a gift cliff. right? the buy cliff. >> right. >> there are other cliffs out there. >> we're back at the opening bell here. >> the real question now is does it affect the consumers? we have not seen consumers go backwards although you saw some confidence numbers come down. i think if we get this solved soon the consumers who have been pretty steady will continue to be there. >> if there is a sense of movement or excessive sense of fear, you can se
. i am begging somebody in washington, step up. be accountable. take responsibility. solve the root cause of these issues. get smart about your weight. >>> the graphic says it, market flash. welcome back to the program. let's look at best buy. the stock's not moving higher, but there are positive comments out there. rare positive comments from an analyst about the store upgrades. bby has been remodeling a number of stores. david chick says they are a real improvement from the old stores. he visited a bunch post, pre, and post remodel. he thinks these are pretty good. he believes they can help with the magnolia sales. their higher end store within a store. making positive comments about these remodels. still, not really helping the stock today. bby shares are down 33% just this quarter. seems like a buyout may be the only big-time hope for bby in the near term. >> brian, thank you for that. currency wars are back. japan's new prime minister is warning the bank of japan had must match efforts by both the u.s. fed and ecb to weaken their own respective currencies. a cnbc contributor an
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)